#HeadsUpFramingham

The Town of Framingham in conjunction with the Framingham Police Department, Framingham Fire Department and the Framingham Department of Public Works is launching #HeadsUpFramingham. #HeadsUpFramingham is a public safety awareness campaign designed to inform our residents, businesses and those that travel through Framingham of strategies to navigate safely through Framingham; whether on foot, in a vehicle or on wheels.

The #HeadsUpFramingham public safety awareness campaign spotlights unsafe behaviors by reminding drivers, pedestrians and cyclists to obey the rules of the road in order to keep themselves and others safe. 

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All types of distractions endanger drivers, pedestrians, passengers, cyclists and bystander safety. These types of distractions include:

  • Texting
  • Using a cell phone or smartphone
  • Eating and drinking
  • Talking
  • Grooming
  • Reading (including maps)
  • Using navigation systems
  • Watching a video
  • Adjusting a radio, CD player, MP3 player or other entertainment device
Take the following precautions to minimize driving distractions:

  • Be a safe and distraction free driver, put your cell phone down and focus on the road.
  • When using an electronic device for directions, set the destination prior to driving.
  • Speak up when you're a passenger and your driver uses an electronic device while driving. Offer to call or text for the driver, so his or her full attention stays on the driving task.
  • Always wear your seat belt. Seat belts are the best defense against other unsafe drivers
Frequently Asked Questions about Distracted Driving:

Is distracted driving really a problem?

Distracted driving kills. The friends, family, and neighbors of the thousands of people killed each year in distracted driving crashes will tell you it is a very serious safety problem. The nearly half a million people injured each year will agree.

What is distracted driving?

Distraction occurs any time you take your eyes off the road, your hands off the wheel, and your mind off your primary task: driving safely. Any non-driving activity you engage in is a potential distraction and increases your risk of crashing.

If it's so dangerous, why do people do it?

Some people still don't know how dangerous distracted driving is. Others know about the risks of texting and talking while driving, but still choose to do so anyway. They make the mistake of thinking the statistics don't apply to them, that they can defy the odds. Still others simply lead busy, stressful lives and use cell phones and smartphones to stay connected with their families, friends, and workplaces. They forget or choose not to shut these devices off when they get behind the wheel.

Who are the most serious offenders?

Our youngest and most inexperienced drivers are most at risk, with 16% of all distracted driving crashes involving drivers under 20. But they are not alone. At any given moment during daylight hours, over 660,000 vehicles are being driven by someone using a hand-held cell phone.

Sending or reading one text is pretty quick, unlike a phone conversation - wouldn't that be okay?

Texting is the most alarming distraction because it involves manual, visual, and cognitive distraction simultaneously. Sending or reading a text takes your eyes off the road for 5 seconds. At 55 mph, that's like driving the length of an entire football field, blindfolded. It's extraordinarily dangerous.

Is it safe to use a hands-free device to talk on a cell phone while driving?

So far, the research indicates that the cognitive distraction of having a hands-free phone conversation causes drivers to miss the important visual and audio cues that would ordinarily help you avoid a crash.

*Data Provided by distraction.gov

 
Take these precautions to minimize distractions while walking:



  • Look left, right and left again before crossing the street; looking left a second time is necessary because a car can cover a lot of distance in a short amount of time
  • Make eye contact with drivers of oncoming vehicles to make sure they see you
  • Be aware of drivers even when you're in a crosswalk; vehicles have blind spots
  • Don't wear headphones while walking
  • Never use a cell phone or other electronic device while walking
  • If your view is blocked, move to a place where you can see oncoming traffic
  • Never rely on a car to stop
  • Children younger than 10 should cross the street with an adult
  • Only cross at designated crosswalks
  • Wear bright and/or reflective clothing
  • Walk in groups

Take these precautions to ensure your safety while cycling:



  • If a vehicle is indicating left turn, passing on the inside can be dangerous. Hang back at the junction to reduce the risk of a collision.
  • Ride positively, decisively and well clear of the curb – look and signal to show drivers what you plan to do and make eye contact where possible so you know drivers have seen you.
  • Avoid riding up the inside of large vehicles, like trucks and buses, where you might not be seen
  • Always use lights after dark or when visibility is poor
  • Wearing light colored or reflective clothing during the day and reflective clothing and/or accessories in the dark increases your visibility
  • THINK! Wearing a correctly fitted cycling helmet, which is securely fastened and conforms to current regulations.